Lost forever? The original Skunk #1 and Mendo Purps – does anyone still have those genes? Cannabis Strain Stories.

Is it possible that someone still has the original Skunk#1 or Mendo Purp genes? Or any of the old and original genelines that no longer exist in their pure and original strains? If you have them, or can find them, they could be worth a lot as breeding stock and would make you famous as their re-discoverer.

Remember, it’s all about the genes. Good genes equal success, it’s just that simple.

Cannabis Seed Breeders Talk About What’s Hot for 2019, Protecting Genes from Corporate Patenting, Testing New Strains in the Market

Some of the owners of the top cannabis seed companies in North America get together to talk frankly and conversationally about what new strains they are creating, the process of cross-breeding cannabis and back-breeding hybrids, how some strains become trendy and then become classics (think Girl Scout Cookies), and many more topics.

It’s a fascinating look into the mysterious world of hybridization and strain creation.

They thank the people behind the open cannabis project for their work to protect the genes so that everyone can benefit from them and use them in breeding, reminding the assembled listeners that some corporations appear to be trying to seize control of critical genes that had been available to all when the plant was illegal, but now were at risk of hostile patenting and licensing.

The speakers are Kevin Jodrey, Nat Pennington of Humboldt Seed Co, Mean Gene from Mendocino of Freeborn Selections and Jason Mathys of Equilibrium Genetics. They reminisce about the appearance of strains in the past that were the result of freedom fighter breeders, and speculate about the new strains they expect to see in the next few years as the breeding industry settles into a new maturity.

They expect the industry to be demanding new characteristics such as mold resistance and heat resistance, the identification of ideal phenotypes ( the shapes and growth forms of the plants in various stages of the life cycle) to meet the new models of farming and production, and exotic terpenes and flavors.

All in all a very useful discussion for those who want to work in this industry in the future.

Advanced Curing, Drying, and Packaging of Cannabis for Medical and Recreational Use

A brilliant discussion on an extremely important topic, curing, drying, and packaging your precious agricultural product. Remember, growing is only one part of the work in the cannabis industry. You have to bring your cannabis to the marketplace, and it has to compete. Which means it is just as vital to process it as it is to grow it.

So, take a few minutes to listen to one of the grandmasters of this industry, Kevin Jodrey of Wonderland Nursery, discussing drying and curing cannabis. And pick up the other gems of wisdom he casually drops as he talks about industrial scale professional drying and how small cannabis businesses can protect themselves in this rapidly changing industry.

Nitro packs – Nitrogen Packaging is for people who don’t know how to stabilize products

Drying cannabis Sending your flower to someone else to dry or run extraction.

What happens if they go out of business or get shut down? What’s your recourse?

Finding people to work with that you trust. Rich tech and finance people entering the space throwing lots of wasted money around.

Kevin Jodrey, Cultivation Director, Wonderland Nursery

How to make CBD Isolate

How to Make CBD Crystal with Simple Chromatography and Evaporation Rigs

Starting with an extract from the dried plants, column chromatography is used to isolate CBD in high purity from the raw extract concentrate. The chromatographed solution is then evaporated to deliver the final result, a nice grade of crystallizes concentrated CBD Isolate.

This is a good quality video delivering a very practical bit of knowledge for those in the cannabis industry. Students at the Cannabis College of America will learn how to do extractions, concentrations, and purifications of many types, gaining skills that will help them understand and perform in the “Back End” of cannabis wholesale and retail, and help them produce the most highly marketable plant products, and understand them to make marketing talk and attemps more effective.

CBD OIL MASSAGE EFFECTIVE FOR PAIN TREATMENT: More Mainstream Articles Supporting Cannabis Products

Mainstream media articles about cannabis and CBD (cannabidiol) continue to increase in number and in the support for the effectiveness and value of cannabis products and medicines. 

Here;s an example, an article about CBD Massage oils and cannabis massages, this one from MSN.

“The frenzy over CBD (also known as cannabinoid, the non-psychoactive component found in a cannabis plant) isn’t slowing down. Canada just legalized the use of recreational cannabis, including CBD, allowing residents to try CBD products to improve issues like anxiety, sexual performance and poor sleep. Many wellness centers are also jumping on board, using products like CBD oil ― arguably one of the most commonly used forms of CBD ― as a way to alleviate customers’ various ailments.

One of those issues? Muscle pain. Studies suggest CBD works as a pain reliever and may even help to relieve the symptoms of arthritis. Anecdotally, people have credited CBD for helping them with their back pain. One of the main ways people do this is by using CBD oil in a massage.”

From https://www.msn.com/en-us/health/pain-management/does-cbd-really-help-with-pain/

The 2018 Farm Bill Passed Today Federally Legalises Hemp, Hemp Products, and the CBD Industry.

Good news for the hemp industry! The 2018 Federal Farm Bill, with the formal name of H.R.2 – Agriculture Improvement Act of 2018, contains sections which make the growing of hemp legal in all 50 states. It places hemp on the list of crops which qualify for crop insurance and sets standards for the states to follow in regulating hemp. As an example, a State may not inspect hemp growing farmland more than once a year.  This bill is nothing less than a revolution for the hemp and hemp products industry.

Of special interest, this bill will make it legal for banks to offer services to hemp farmers and hemp businesses.

In the bill, in the section titled Subtitle G- Hemp Production, hemp is defined as cannabis sativa with a low THC content. The language regarding derivatives, extracts, cannabinoids, and isomers formally legalizes CBD products and anything else entrepreneur’s wish to manufacture from hemp.

Below are some of the sections of the bill discussing hemp.  Left out are the hemp research sections, which may be the subject of a future post.

Here is the section that defines hemp:

(1) HEMP.—The term hemp means the plant Cannabis sativa L. and any part of that plant, including the seeds thereof and all derivatives, extracts, cannabinoids, isomers, acids, salts, and salts of isomers, whether growing or not, with a delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol concentration of not more than 0.3 percent on a dry weight basis.

This is the link to the bill:

https://www.congress.gov/bill/115th-congress/house-bill/2/text

H.R.2 – Agriculture Improvement Act of 2018

Sec. 7125. Supplemental and alternative crops; hemp.

Sec. 7415. Legitimacy of industrial hemp research.

Sec. 10111. Hemp production.

SEC. 7125. SUPPLEMENTAL AND ALTERNATIVE CROPS; HEMP.

Section 1473D of the National Agricultural Research, Extension, and Teaching Policy Act of 1977 (7 U.S.C. 3319d) is amended—

(1) in subsection (a)—

(A) by striking 2018 and inserting 2023; and

(B) by striking crops, and inserting crops (including canola),;

(2) in subsection (b)—

(A) by inserting for agronomic rotational purposes and as a habitat for honey bees and other pollinators after alternative crops; and

(B) by striking commodities whose and all that follows through the period at the end and inserting commodities.;

(3) in subsection (c)(3)(E), by inserting (including hemp (as defined in section 297A of the Agricultural Marketing Act of 1946)) after material; and

(4) in subsection (e)(2), by striking 2018 and inserting 2023.

SEC. 7401. CRITICAL AGRICULTURAL MATERIALS ACT.

(a) Hemp Research.—Section 5(b)(9) of the Critical Agricultural Materials Act (7 U.S.C. 178c(b)(9)) is amended by inserting , and including hemp (as defined in section 297A of the Agricultural Marketing Act of 1946) after hydrocarbon-containing plants.

SEC. 7415. LEGITIMACY OF INDUSTRIAL HEMP RESEARCH.

(a) In General.—Section 7606 of the Agricultural Act of 2014 (7 U.S.C. 5940) is amended—

(1) by redesignating subsections (a) and (b) as subsections (b) and (a), respectively, and moving the subsections so as to appear in alphabetical order;

(2) in subsection (b) (as so redesignated), in the subsection heading, by striking In General and inserting Industrial Hemp Research; and

(3) by adding at the end the following:

“(c) Study And Report.—

“(1) IN GENERAL.—The Secretary shall conduct a study of agricultural pilot programs—

“(A) to determine the economic viability of the domestic production and sale of industrial hemp; and

“(B) that shall include a review of—

“(i) each agricultural pilot program; and

“(ii) any other agricultural or academic research relating to industrial hemp.

“(2) REPORT.—Not later than 120 days after the date of enactment of this subsection, the Secretary shall submit to Congress a report describing the results of the study conducted under paragraph (1).”.

(b) Repeal.—Effective on the date that is 1 year after the date on which the Secretary establishes a plan under section 297C of the Agricultural Marketing Act of 1946, section 7606 of the Agricultural Act of 2014 (7 U.S.C. 5940) is repealed.



SEC. 10111. HEMP PRODUCTION.

The Agricultural Marketing Act of 1946 (7 U.S.C. 1621 et seq.) is amended by adding at the end the following:



“Subtitle GHemp Production

SEC. 297A. DEFINITIONS.

In this subtitle:

“(1) HEMP.—The term hemp means the plant Cannabis sativa L. and any part of that plant, including the seeds thereof and all derivatives, extracts, cannabinoids, isomers, acids, salts, and salts of isomers, whether growing or not, with a delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol concentration of not more than 0.3 percent on a dry weight basis.

“(2) INDIAN TRIBE.—The term Indian tribe has the meaning given the term in section 4 of the Indian Self-Determination and Education Assistance Act (25 U.S.C. 5304).

“(3) SECRETARY.—The term Secretary means the Secretary of Agriculture.

“(4) STATE.—The term State means—

“(A) a State;

“(B) the District of Columbia;

“(C) the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico; and

“(D) any other territory or possession of the United States.

“(5) STATE DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE.—The term State department of agriculture means the agency, commission, or department of a State government responsible for agriculture in the State.

“(6) TRIBAL GOVERNMENT.—The term Tribal government means the governing body of an Indian tribe.

SEC. 297B. STATE AND TRIBAL PLANS.

“(a) Submission.—

“(1) IN GENERAL.—A State or Indian tribe desiring to have primary regulatory authority over the production of hemp in the State or territory of the Indian tribe shall submit to the Secretary, through the State department of agriculture (in consultation with the Governor and chief law enforcement officer of the State) or the Tribal government, as applicable, a plan under which the State or Indian tribe monitors and regulates that production as described in paragraph (2).

“(2) CONTENTS.—A State or Tribal plan referred to in paragraph (1)—

“(A) shall only be required to include—

“(i) a practice to maintain relevant information regarding land on which hemp is produced in the State or territory of the Indian tribe, including a legal description of the land, for a period of not less than 3 calendar years;

“(ii) a procedure for testing, using post-decarboxylation or other similarly reliable methods, delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol concentration levels of hemp produced in the State or territory of the Indian tribe;

“(iii) a procedure for the effective disposal of products that are produced in violation of this subtitle;

“(iv) a procedure to comply with the enforcement procedures under subsection (d);

“(v) a procedure for conducting annual inspections of a random sample of hemp producers—

“(I) to verify that hemp is not produced in violation of this subtitle; and

“(II) in a manner that ensures that a hemp producer is subject to not more than 1 inspection each year; and

“(vi) a certification that the State or Indian tribe has the resources and personnel to carry out the practices and procedures described in clauses (i) through (v); and

“(B) may include any other practice or procedure established by a State or Indian tribe, as applicable, to the extent that the practice or procedure is consistent with this subtitle.

“(3) RELATION TO STATE AND TRIBAL LAW.—

“(A) NO PREEMPTION.—Nothing in this subsection preempts or limits any law of a State or Indian tribe regulating the production of hemp, to the extent that law is consistent with this subtitle.

“(B) REFERENCES IN PLANS.—A State or Tribal plan referred to in paragraph (1) may include a reference to a law of the State or Indian tribe regulating the production of hemp, to the extent that law is consistent with this subtitle.

“(b) Approval.—

“(1) IN GENERAL.—Not later than 60 days after receipt of a State or Tribal plan under subsection (a), the Secretary shall—

“(A) approve the State or Tribal plan if the State or Tribal plan complies with subsection (a); or

“(B) disapprove the State or Tribal plan only if the State or Tribal plan does not comply with subsection (a).

“(2) AMENDED PLANS.—If the Secretary disapproves a State or Tribal plan under paragraph (1)(B), the State, through the State department of agriculture (in consultation with the Governor and chief law enforcement officer of the State) or the Tribal government, as applicable, may submit to the Secretary an amended State or Tribal plan that complies with subsection (a).

“(3) CONSULTATION.—The Secretary may consult with the Attorney General in carrying out this subsection.

“(c) Technical Assistance.—The Secretary may provide technical assistance to a State or Indian tribe in the development of a State or Tribal plan under subsection (a).

“(d) Violations.—

“(1) IN GENERAL.—A violation of a State or Tribal plan approved under subsection (b) shall be subject to enforcement solely in accordance with this subsection.

“(2) NEGLIGENT VIOLATIONS.—

“(A) IN GENERAL.—A hemp producer in a State or the territory of an Indian tribe for which a State or Tribal plan is approved under subsection (b) shall be subject to subparagraph (B) of this paragraph if the State department of agriculture or Tribal government, as applicable, determines that the hemp producer has negligently violated the State or Tribal plan, including by negligently—

“(i) failing to provide a legal description of land on which the producer produces hemp;

“(ii) failing to obtain a license or other required authorization from the State department of agriculture or Tribal government, as applicable; or

“(iii) producing Cannabis sativa L. with a delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol concentration of more than 0.3 percent on a dry weight basis.

“(B) CORRECTIVE ACTION PLAN.—A hemp producer described in subparagraph (A) shall comply with a plan established by the State department of agriculture or Tribal government, as applicable, to correct the negligent violation, including—

“(i) a reasonable date by which the hemp producer shall correct the negligent violation; and

“(ii) a requirement that the hemp producer shall periodically report to the State department of agriculture or Tribal government, as applicable, on the compliance of the hemp producer with the State or Tribal plan for a period of not less than the next 2 calendar years.

“(C) RESULT OF NEGLIGENT VIOLATION.—Except as provided in subparagraph (D), a hemp producer that negligently violates a State or Tribal plan under subparagraph (A) shall not as a result of that violation be subject to any criminal or civil enforcement action by the Federal Government or any State government, Tribal government, or local government other than the enforcement action authorized under subparagraph (B).

“(D) REPEAT VIOLATIONS.—A hemp producer that negligently violates a State or Tribal plan under subparagraph (A) 3 times in a 5-year period shall be ineligible to produce hemp for a period of 5 years beginning on the date of the third violation.

“(3) OTHER VIOLATIONS.—

“(A) IN GENERAL.—If the State department of agriculture or Tribal government in a State or the territory of an Indian tribe for which a State or Tribal plan is approved under subsection (b), as applicable, determines that a hemp producer in the State or territory has violated the State or Tribal plan with a culpable mental state greater than negligence—

“(i) the State department of agriculture or Tribal government, as applicable, shall immediately report the hemp producer to—

“(I) the Attorney General; and

“(II) in the case of a State department of agriculture, the chief law enforcement officer of the State; and

“(ii) paragraph (1) of this subsection shall not apply to the violation.

“(B) FELONY.—Any person convicted of a felony relating to a controlled substance under State or Federal law shall be ineligible—

“(i) to participate in the program established under this section; and

“(ii) to produce hemp under any regulations or guidelines issued under section 297D(a).

“(C) FALSE STATEMENT.—Any person who materially falsifies any information contained in an application to participate in the program established under this section shall be ineligible to participate in that program.

“(e) Authorization Of Appropriations.—There are authorized to be appropriated such sums as are necessary to carry out this section.

“(f) Effect.—Nothing in this section prohibits the production of hemp in a State or the territory of an Indian tribe for which a State or Tribal plan is not approved under this section in accordance with section 297C or other Federal laws (including regulations).

SEC. 297C. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE.

“(a) Department Of Agriculture Plan.—

“(1) IN GENERAL.—In the case of a State or Indian tribe for which a State or Tribal plan is not approved under section 297B, the production of hemp in that State or the territory of that Indian tribe shall be subject to a plan established by the Secretary to monitor and regulate that production in accordance with paragraph (2).

“(2) CONTENT.—A plan established by the Secretary under paragraph (1) shall include—

“(A) a practice to maintain relevant information regarding land on which hemp is produced in the State or territory of the Indian tribe, including a legal description of the land, for a period of not less than 3 calendar years;

“(B) a procedure for testing, using post-decarboxylation or other similarly reliable methods, delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol concentration levels of hemp produced in the State or territory of the Indian tribe;

“(C) a procedure for the effective disposal of products that are produced in violation of this subtitle;

“(D) a procedure to comply with the enforcement procedures under subsection (c)(2);

“(E) a procedure for conducting annual inspections of a random sample of hemp producers—

“(i) to verify that hemp is not produced in violation of this subtitle; and

“(ii) in a manner that ensures that a hemp producer is subject to not more than 1 inspection each year; and

“(F) such other practices or procedures as the Secretary considers to be appropriate, to the extent that the practice or procedure is consistent with this subtitle.

“(b) Licensing.—The Secretary shall establish a procedure to issue licenses to hemp producers in accordance with a plan established under subsection (a).

“(c) Violations.—

“(1) IN GENERAL.—In the case of a State or Indian tribe for which a State or Tribal plan is not approved under section 297B, it shall be unlawful to produce hemp in that State or the territory of that Indian tribe without a license issued by the Secretary under subsection (b).

“(2) NEGLIGENT AND OTHER VIOLATIONS.—A violation of a plan established under subsection (a) shall be subject to enforcement in accordance with paragraphs (2) and (3) of section 297B(d), except that the Secretary shall carry out that enforcement instead of a State department of agriculture or Tribal government.

“(3) REPORTING TO ATTORNEY GENERAL.—In the case of a State or Indian tribe covered by paragraph (1), the Secretary shall report the production of hemp without a license issued by the Secretary under subsection (b) to the Attorney General.

SEC. 297D. AUTHORITY TO ISSUE REGULATIONS AND GUIDELINES; EFFECT ON OTHER LAW.

“(a) Authority.—

“(1) IN GENERAL.—The Secretary shall have sole authority to issue Federal regulations and guidelines that relate to the production of hemp, including Federal regulations and guidelines that relate to the implementation of sections 297B and 279C.

“(2) CONSULTATION WITH ATTORNEY GENERAL.—The Secretary may consult with the Attorney General before issuing regulations and guidelines under paragraph (1).

“(b) Effect On Other Law.—Nothing in this subtitle shall affect or modify—

“(1) the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (21 U.S.C. 301 et seq.); or

“(2) the authority of the Commissioner of Food and Drugs and the Secretary of Health and Human Services under that Act.”.

SEC. 10112. RULE OF CONSTRUCTION.

Nothing in this title authorizes interference with the interstate commerce of hemp (as defined in section 297A of the Agricultural Marketing Act of 1946, as added by section 10111).TITLE XICROP INSURANCE

SEC. 11101. DEFINITIONS.

Section 502(b) of the Federal Crop Insurance Act (7 U.S.C. 1502(b)) is amended—

(1) by redesignating paragraphs (6), (7), (8), (9), (10), and (11) as paragraphs (7), (8), (10), (11), (12), and (13) respectively;

(2) by inserting after paragraph (5) the following:

“(6) COVER CROP TERMINATION.—The term cover crop termination means a practice that historically and under reasonable circumstances results in the termination of the growth of a cover crop.”; and

(3) by inserting after paragraph (8) (as so redesignated) the following:

“(9) HEMP.—The term hemp has the meaning given the term in section 297A of the Agricultural Marketing Act of 1946.”.



CocaCola confirm plans for a “Healthy” Cannabis Based Drink with CBD worth Billion$,

From Sky News:

“”Along with many others in the beverage industry, we are closely watching the growth of non-psychoactive CBD as an ingredient in functional wellness beverages around the world. The space is evolving quickly,” he said.

Cannabidiol, or CBD, does not produce the high normally associated with marijuana.

It is believed by many to have anti-inflammation and pain-relieving properties, and numerous CBD-infused products have emerged recently.”

https://news.sky.com/story/coca-cola-contemplates-healthy-cannabis-drink-11501075

The article describes other companies that are planning to make CND drinks. Anyone who has been following cannabis marketing and CBD knows that there are already a large number of drinks and sodas and energy drinks and protein drinks that have either CBD or in the states with legal recreational cannabis also have THC and the flavorful terpenes and flavonoids of psychoactive cannabis.

These drinks have been very popular and will continue to be popular.

This is an example of the old industries running to try to catch up and stake their clkaim in teh exploding cannabis marketplace.

There will always be a place for gourmet and boutique products, including all kinds of drinks and foods. These smaller businesses will never be pushed ouyt of teh market by the older giants.

Why? The tastes of the people have changed. 50 years of drug war has raised whole generations that appreciate the experience of small batch and gourmet cannabis. These people will keep that pattern of preference the rest of their lives, and because cannabis will claim the position of gourmet product from the very beginning, there will always be a thriving small business economy based on intermediate to tiny businesses providing new tastes and fragrances and experiences of cannabis enjoyment.

Think about this – there are already a number of cannabis beers. But the cannabis seed is very well suited to brewing. We will soon see an exploding cannabis beer industry, that both bottles and brews in place to provide in-house brews with striking flavors, taking advantage of the states that allow food and hospitality businesses to bypass alcohol control laws and limits and licenses by brewing in-house.

I want a Lemon Haze light lager, ice cold, please.